Pittsburgh modular voltage research laboratory on kickstarter now

Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers showcase completely different, organic analog synthesizer at SUPERBOOTH19


PITTSBURGH, PA, USA: musician- and sonic architect-attentive electronic instruments-maker Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers is proud to debut Voltage Research Laboratory — a completely different, organic analog synthesizer, functionally influenced by the behaviours and systems of the natural world, with which adventurous users can explore the natural systems and lesser-known fringes of analog synthesis as a wildly experimental and extremely deep sonic playground — at SUPERBOOTH19 in Berlin, May 9-11…
As Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers’ most ambitious and experimental synthesizer offering to date, Voltage Research Laboratory comprises three separate modules that are 100% compatible with the ever-popular Eurorack small-format modular system, housed together in a purpose-built, handmade Eurorack case. Collectively they are so much more than an assemblage of tools and functions, rather representing a unique modular synthesizer seriously designed to reward deep experimentation, encouraging the creation of unique sonic systems.
Central to Voltage Research Laboratory’s unique sound palette is its lifeforms voltage lab module. Musically or otherwise, it originates with a complex oscillator pair — primary oscillator and secondary oscillator — that utilise a wide range of shaping and manipulation options to move away from basic geometric shapes to more harmonically rich tones. There is also a custom wave folder with enhanced waveform warping, linear FM, amplitude modulation, ring modulation, waveform cycling, hard sync, and more besides — all available for serious sonic research.
More manipulation comes courtesy of a set of multi-function generators — function generator a and function generator b, which work as interactive voltage processing systems to create and modify complex control voltages. Acting as voltage-controllable envelopes, LFOs, slew generators, and more, these function generators give life to evolving control signals.
Thereafter, twin dynamics controllers — dynamics controller a and dynamics controller b — bring everything together. After all, as a unique circuit expanding on the classic low pass gate, the dynamics controller with variable response adds an organic depth to the lifeforms voltage lab module by simulating the natural behaviour of sound. Saying that, the multi-mode signal processor features a 12dB resonant filter, VCA, and percussive low pass gate modes.
Meanwhile, back in the natural world, sound interacts with its surroundings, so the lifeforms voltage lab module makes use of an analog delay to simulate this interaction and create an artificial sense of time and space. Sonic manipulation of delay time and feedback add depth and warmth through chorus-, Doppler-, echo-, flanger-, reverb-, and slapback-type effects.
Chaos can be found everywhere. Electronically, random gates and control voltages spark uncontrolled reactions, disrupt systems, and generate ideas. It is for that very reason that the lifeforms voltage lab module includes noise, stepped random CV, a pseudo-random sequence generator, pitched random CV, pitched random sequences, and random gates to add multiple levels of unpredictability to any patch.
Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers’ Voltage Research Laboratory itself includes the lifeforms touch controller module. Intuitive and inspiring, it effectively overcomes the creative restrictions of a traditional chromatic keyboard with a set of fully-configurable, multi-dimensional touch pads as a duophonic touch controller. By bringing into play two sets of five touch pads, it offers a flexible and interactive performance surface, so performances can be interpreted with a unique combination of monophonic and duophonic responses. The lifeforms touch controller module’s channel animator also allows speedy generation of complex sequences or glitchy chaos — all in all, then, the perfect launchpad for any experimental journey, be it musical or otherwise.
As a Voltage Research Laboratory exclusive, the lifeforms utility module features a unity gain signal mixer/splitter along with stereo headphone and line outputs, rounding out the functionality of this completely different, organic analog synthesizer.
The three Voltage Research Laboratory modules are housed in a beautiful 96hp Eurorack enclosure, shaped with the warmth of walnut and the strength of steel. Suitably named, the Lifeforms Research Console case perfectly pairs classic desktop synthesizer ergonomics with a modern Eurorack form factor and a clean, reliable power supply.
Showcasing Voltage Research Laboratory for all to see and hear for the time first time on booth (O226) at SUPERBOOTH19 — Europe’s first and largest trade fair for electronic musical instruments — in Berlin, May 9-11, Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers has launched its funding campaign on Kickstarter.

The SRP (Suggested Retail Price) for Voltage Research Laboratory is $1,599.00 USD — discount available to Kickstarter supporters; explore and support the Kickstarter campaign for Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers’ Voltage Research Laboratory project here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/pittsburghmodular/voltage-research-laboratory-organic-modular-synthe

Note that Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers will also be selling the lifeforms voltage lab and lifeforms touch controller Eurorack modules and Lifeforms Research Console case separately with SRPs of $899.00 USD, $399.00 USD, and $349.00 USD, respectively — discounts available to Kickstarter supporters, while the lifeforms voltage lab module will also be available as the Voltage Lab Blackbox standalone synthesizer with an SRP of $999.00 USD — discount available to Kickstarter supporters.
Watch Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers’ intriguing introductory video for Voltage Research Laboratory here:https://youtu.be/fk2D0SAVtYU 

Motor synth from Gamechanger audio announced.

Gamechanger | Audio unveils revolutionary electro-mechanical Motor Synth at SUPERBOOTH19


RIGA, LATVIA: having presented an initial proof-of-concept prototype product at The 2019 NAMM Show in Southern California, January 24-27, uncharted music electronics territories explorer Gamechanger | Audio is proud to unveil the revolutionary Motor Synth — a digitally-controlled analogue electro-mechanical synthesizer that uses a system of electromotors (to convert electrical energy into mechanical energy) as its main sound source — in its finished desktop design at SUPERBOOTH19 in Berlin, May 9-11
Motor Synth really represents a new method of analogue audio signal synthesis since digitally-controlled electromotors have never been used as the principal sound source for a commercial musical instrument — indeed, nothing like it has ever been built before! But actions always speak louder than words. So how, exactly, does the revolutionary Motor Synth work?
Well, simply speaking, Motor Synth produces sounds by accelerating and decelerating eight electromotors to precise rpm (revolutions per minute) that correspond with specific musical notes. Needless to say, the instrument in question’s eight-electromotor configuration means that it is a four- note true polyphonic synth with two voices per key played.
Digging deeper, Motor Synth takes a two-pronged approach to producing its core sound, starting with magnetic pickups placed on each of its eight electromotors; those electromotors’ spinning coils result in a very industrial-sounding, ridiculously over-the-top analogue tone — think eight harmonious revving engines pumping out an intimidating noise! Next, specially-designed reflective optical disks have been attached to the shafts of each electromotor. Each disk contains a graphical representation of some standard audio wave-shapes. As the electromotors spin, the disks are set into circular motion, and each wave-shape is read by a dedicated set of UV (ultraviolet) sensors, then converted into an audio signal. So the wave-shapes on the reflective optical disks become precise musical notes, corresponding to the speed of the electromotors.
Elsewhere, Motor Synth still features familiar analogue audio processing circuits — filters, envelopes, et al — alongside arpeggiation, cross- modulation sequencing, and multiple polyphonic mode facilities, as well as an innovative looping system that allows adventurous users to layer rhythm and melodies, just like when using a loop station.
Manifestly, Motor Synth is a desktop design — unlike its initial proof-of-concept prototype predecessor, but it can still be played out of the box via eight built-in control keys and four floating tuning pots. Performers and composers can, of course, connect any standard MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) controller, like a keyboard or DAW (Digital Audio Workstation), while Motor Synth is also capable of tracking a monophonic audio signal, such as guitar or bass, via its 1/4-inch mono input. Interestingly, Motor Synth can be configured to act as a harmonizer for electric guitars or other melodic instruments, recognising the pitch of a musical tone and instantly generating a complimentary tone by operating an electromotor at a matching frequency. Furthermore, users can create intervals and chords based on the frequency of the incoming signal with no need (necessarily) for a MIDI controller or inputting preprogrammed musical information.
Whatever way anyone chooses to play Motor Synth, a stunning visual experience is guaranteed. Get this: Motor Synth’s see-through protective glass cover above its core sound system of eight electromotors enables users to receive visual feedback from the instrument itself by being able to see those spinning electromotors in action. But better still, the visual experience is enhanced still further by the also-visible set of reflective optical disks attached to the electromotors’ shafts being coupled to a set of eight mini strobe lights, so those spinning disks themselves turn into a hypnotic light show, courtesy of the strobe effect!
As an instrument that uses electromotors as its main sound source, Motor Synth inherently possesses many unique sound traits that will surely appeal to many musicians that favour analogue electronic instruments and synthesizers in particular. Put it this way: with its unusual tonal and timbral qualities, unlimited microtonal pitch adjustment and modulation abilities, and note attack and decay properties influenced by the acceleration and deceleration curves of electromotors, Motor Synth works well across a wide range of musical styles.
Showcasing its third revolutionary product, Gamechanger | Audio will be proudly unveiling Motor Synth on booth (H320) at SUPERBOOTH19 — Europe’s first and largest trade fair for electronic musical instruments — in Berlin, May 9-11. Thereafter, it will be following in the super-successful crowdfunding footsteps of Gamechanger | Audio’s PLASMA Pedal, perfectly realising a revolutionary approach within the realm of overdrive and distortion by transforming the connected instrument’s live signal into a series of continuous high-voltage discharges within a xenon-filled tube, thanks to achieving 921% funding on Indiegogo in April 2018 (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/plasma-pedal-high-voltage-distortion-unit–3#/). No doubt the equally- revolutionary electro-mechanical Motor Synth will follow suit, successfully realising a new method of analogue audio signal synthesis. 

Explore and support the Indiegogo campaign for Gamechanger | Audio’s Motor Synth project here:https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/motor-synth/coming_soon
Watch Gamechanger | Audio’s automotive-assisted video for Motor Synth here: https://youtu.be/AaIhBu4adZ8
For more in-depth info, please visit the dedicated Motor Synth webpage here: https://www.gamechangeraudio.com/motor-synth/ 

Ik multimedia unveils Uno Analog /pcm drum machine

IK Multimedia unveils UNO Drum analog/PCM drum machine

Ultra-portable, easily programmable drum machine expands the UNO line

UNO Drum

May 8, 2019 – IK Multimedia unveils UNO® Drum, the newest member of its UNO series.  Designed in collaboration with Italian analog specialist Soundmachines – the same team behind IK’s acclaimed UNO® Synth – UNO Drum offers a wide sonic palette combining fat, punchy analog sounds with digital flexibility and convenience. A robust selection of programming and live performance features and controls makes it easy for musicians, producers and DJs to add massive drum grooves to their music. UNO Drum’s compact form, battery power and affordable price make it ideal for on-the-go music creation and performance.

True analog tone and PCM flexibility
Six warm, rich, true analog drum sounds – two different kick drums plus snares, claps, and hi-hats – form the essential core kit for creating fat analog beats. Additional PCM elements (with 54 samples to choose from) provide deeper sonic flavors. They include toms, rims, cowbells, rides and crash cymbals for creating complex, unique and full rhythm tracks. Up to 12 elements can be used in total between analog and digital sounds, with 11-voice polyphony available. The analog and digital elements can be freely swapped, for sonic possibilities that go beyond the pre-set combinations. Together, these analog and PCM sounds suit the widest genres of music and musicians, and a variety of live scenarios.

A wide range of drum elements is organized in UNO Drum’s 100 pre-programmed and fully editable drum kit presets, a first in its class. This makes it easier and faster for users to find an inspiring kit they can experiment with or tweak to create the perfect groove. All sounds can be stored and recalled on the fly.

Top panel editing controls allow for adjustment of key parameters of each sound element. Users can tweak the Tuning of their kicks for sub-shaking hip-hop, adjust the Snap for punchy EDM drums, push the Decay for thundering industrial sounds, and much more. UNO Drum’s in-depth controls encourage experimentation to take drum tracks far beyond the norm.

Analog audio effects with character
For added punch and sound character that stands out in a mix, UNO Drum also offers two analog master audio effects: Drive and Compressor. Increasing the drive will make grooves hit harder, with an aggressive edge. Adding compression will result in tracks that are tighter, fatter, and more powerful. User settings can be saved along with drum kits for instant recall.

Easy to play and program
UNO Drum offers 12 touch-sensitive pads with two velocity zones, for more expressive live playing and easier programming. They can be used to play entire beats live with a pad-style feel, or to easily add live flare on top of pre-programmed rhythms.

These pads are also used to select individual drum pattern elements. Each element’s pad can be used to edit parameters for that specific drum sound, in real-time, as patterns play. This enables users to evolve tracks, build tension towards a drop, go lo-fi for a break, and more. For added performance convenience, a dedicated Tap Tempo pad is also included.

Flexible programming options
UNO Drum offers easy programming options to suit any style. The 64-step sequencer allows users to program in patterns one step at a time, using the 16 buttons across the bottom of the panel, or record a pattern in real-time. Up to eight parameters can be automated per step, to add even more variation and feel to their grooves. The Song mode lets users chain up to 64 patterns together to create extended grooves. Any of the stored sequences can be triggered live on the fly, in any order desired.

Additionally, for quick inspiration out of the box, UNO Drum also comes pre-loaded with 100 drum patterns (in addition to the 100 drum kits). Users can quickly scroll through choices and find a pattern that adds the perfect flavor to their genre, or experiment with new styles. Sounds can be swapped out or adjusted, and patterns can be instantly saved and revisited at a later time.

Head-turning performance effects
For even more performance impact, UNO Drum offers a generous set of five performance effects on the programmed patterns: Stutter (from subtle repetitions to DJ style loops), Roll, Humanize (slight randomization of velocity, timing and volume to emulate a live drummer), Swing (timing and accent adjustments) and Random (brand new pattern creations).

Integrate into any live, studio, or mobile set-up
For use at home, in the studio, in a DJ booth, and beyond, UNO Drum can perfectly integrate into regular live set-ups, computer DAW-based studios, or mobile rigs centered around an iOS device. It offers USB and traditional MIDI via 2.5mm jacks (cables included) for use with Mac/PC, iOS devices or traditional outboard MIDI gear, for a perfect pairing in any rig. UNO Drum also offers an audio input to daisy chain directly with IK’s UNO Synth or any other gear, routed through its internal compressor, with no need for an additional mixer.

On-the-go music made easy
Weighing only 400g, UNO Drum is super lightweight and small enough to fit in a backpack, yet sturdy enough to hit the road for gigging. It can also be used as a portable sketchpad to create grooves and songs that can be saved and recalled whenever and wherever they’re needed. UNO Drum can be powered by 4 AA batteries or via the USB port, either from a computer or a battery pack.

Pricing and availability
UNO Drum is available for pre-order from the IK Multimedia online store with free shipping* and for pre-order from IK authorized dealers worldwide, for the affordable price of only $/€249.99**.

UNO Drum is proudly made in IK’s own Italian manufacturing facility using a combination of state-of-the-art, automated mounting machines and test systems, and fine, renowned Italian craftsmanship. Shipping is scheduled for June 2019.

* Free shipping valid for pre-orders from the IK Multimedia online store only
** All prices excluding taxes

For more information about UNO Drum, please visit: www.unodrum.com

To see UNO Drum in action or watch the tutorial series: www.unodrum.com/video

Impulse command from analog solutions announced


Analogue Solutions ships compact true stereo analogue monosynth/sonic realiser as perfectly-packaged desktop device


KINGSWINFORD, UK: British boutique electronic instruments innovator Analogue Solutions is proud to announce availability of Impulse Command — creatively crafting a true stereo, semi-modular analogue monosynth/sonic realiser, replete with fanciful features likeDUAL DYNAMIC ANALOGUE OSCILLATORSDUAL ANALOGUE FILTERS; stereo digital EFFECTS; 16-step MIDI LOOP SEQUENCER and STEP SEQ (with radical REORDER!function); and more, meaning it can conceivably sound like several simultaneously-playing synthesizers as a perfectly-packaged desktop device — as of April 2…
As is, indeed, the case with all Analogue Solutions’ innovative instruments,Impulse Command is a ‘real’ analogue affair… as in its audio signal path — post effects apart — and all modulation routings really are analogue through and through. The chosen company name gives the genuine game away. After all,Analogue Solutions’ circuitry capitalises on superlative-sounding designs dating back to the Seventies, so no quantisation for CPU (Central Processing Unit) reading required. The VCOs (Voltage Controlled Oscillators), VCFs (Voltage Controlled Filters), EGs (Envelope Generators), and LFOs (Low Frequency Oscillators) are all truly analogue in the Seventies sense of the word, with transistors, op-amps, and resistors. Reality dictates, therefore, that — apart from the MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) conversion, sequencer control, and digital delay/reverb essential elements — Impulse Command is reallyanalogue. As such, sound benefits become apparent as soon as anyone feasts their ears on the remarkable result. Is it any wonder, then, that there is so much favourable commentary about how good Analogue Solutions’ synthesizers sound!
So potential purchasers can clearly take it as ‘red’ — pun intended, given its eye-catching colour scheme! — that Impulse Command sounds as good as analogue gets. Given that Impulse Command is designed by Analogue Solutions founderTom Carpenter, this surely shouldn’t come as as surprise. As a fervent fan of electronic music and also an active electronic musician himself, he naturally knows a thing or two about programming synthesizers. So his current creation clearly wasn’t the result of engineering design decisions driven by a steering committee of men (or women) in suits, compulsorily constrained to maximise profit for faceless shareholders. Far from it, in fact. Fortunately for all, the fanciful features available and resultant range of tones they can capably produce have all been carefully thought through to impart Impulse Commandwith what’s required to speedily bring about a wide range of sounds that true analogue admirers could conceivably call for — from huge basses, synth leads, percussion, and effects through to modular system-like stylings.
So what makes this superlative-sounding, Seventies-inspired innovative instrument truly tick? The subtractive synthesis signal path in Impulse Command creatively gets going with two VCOs, producing the raw audio sound source for later processing. Providing a wealth of features and modulation choices in and of themselves, VCO1 boasts a white noise generator alongside sawtooth and triangle waveforms, while VCO2 DETUNE does just that — detuning VCO2 to thicken up the resulting synth sound. Thereafter, things start to take a turn towards the fanciful with AMOUNT applying the amount of MIDIVEL (velocity) or EG2 signal that will be applied to modulate VCO2’s volume, selected via a toggle switch, while I.L. manually sets the initial level of VCO2volume, and allows that level to be dynamically controlled when set to zero; speaking of oscillators, the VELOCITY control sets the amount of MIDI velocity that will be applied to the square wave-equipped SUB (sub-oscillator) volume, while I.L. manually sets the initial level of SUB volume, so also allows that level to be dynamically controlled when set to zero — hence the DUAL DYNAMIC ANALOGUE OSCILLATORS wording boldly blazoned across Impulse Command’s easy-to-follow front panel!
Pitch modulation, meanwhile, such as vibrato or a pitch sweep, can be obtained by patching with cables using the mini-jack sockets sited along the top of the front panel. Put it this way: while Impulse Command is mostly pre-patched, it has such a wide range of modulation routing possibilities that it is almost as versatile as a full modular system and is capable of producing the same types of sounds — albeit without the mess and confusion of cables. It does, however, have a sizeable selection of patch sockets that allow adventurous users to re-patch it or connect it to an external modular system.
So what about that DUAL ANALOGUE FILTERING wording? Well, as implied,Impulse Command comes complete with two CEM chip-style filters — the same type as those used in classic synths such as the Elka Synthex, Fairlight CMI, Oberheim OB8, and Sequential Circuits Prophet-5, to name but a notable few. Despite sharing the same core circuitry as those vintage classics, Impulse Command is imbued with its own sonic character, rather than simply sounding like them. Many of the controls are duplicated for each of those 24dB/octave filters. The upper VCF is called VCF-L (left) and the signal — following its own dedicated VCA — is routed to the left output jack. It stands to reason, then, that the lower VCF is called VCF-R (right) and the signal — following its own dedicated VCA — is routed to the right output jack. Commonly, CUTOFF sets the master frequency cutoff for both filters, while PEAK sets the resonance/feedback level of both filters. Further left field, perhaps, VCF-R DETUNE offsets the second filter’s frequency cutoff, while VELOCITY sets the amount of MIDI velocity that will modulate the cutoff of both filters, andAGGRO adds cross modulation from VCO2 to the filter CUTOFF, creating a more edgy sound — increasing PEAK to higher levels emphasises this effect. Elsewhere, there are no fewer than four modulation sources — namely, EG1, EG2, LFO1, and LFO2, while LEVEL sets the level of modulation applied to the filter CUTOFF. Creatively, MOD INVERT inverts the modulation for VCF-L, which, as an example, enables pseudo-auto-pan effects. External sound sources, such as vocals, guitars, mixer sends, and samplers, etc, can be sent through the filters for further treatment by simply plugging the sound source into the rearside IN (input) socket. All in all, a flexible filtering section that belies this relatively diminutive desktop device’s space-saving (322 x 270mm) footprint.
Following on from filtering, Impulse Command’s signal path arrives at two separate analogue ADSR envelopes. EG2 is hardwired to control the VCAs that follow the VCFs, but both EGs are available for modulation of various circuits and have trigger and signal output jacks for further patching.
Processing plays a part in Impulse Command’s musical makeup. Primarily designed as a powerful analogue synthesizer, some essential effects — bit crush, delay, flanger, and reverb — have been included to give the resulting sound some ambience. The latter three effects can even be modulated to a degree by the STEP SEQ (sequencer), so they can be dynamically controlled! Control-wise, turning EFFECT selects the eight presets, while ASPECT1 and ASPECT2 are used to make some adjustments to the sound space preset selected. Sequencing is where the sounding-like-several-synthesizers-simultaneously-playing-Impulse Command can come into its own like no other, though. There are two sequencers — an analogue STEP SEQ (that produces voltages) and a MIDI LOOP SEQUENCER (that produces MIDI note loops). Both are clocked from the same signal source, selected using the SEQUENCER SYNCHRO switch, though theMIDI LOOP SEQUENCER can be independently stopped and started. As implied by name, the MIDI LOOP SEQUENCER is used to record melodic loops and will always run in time with the analogue STEP SEQ, which is primarily used for modulation. But both benefit from the radical REORDER! function that affects the sequencer stepping order — forwards, backwards, and all sorts of strange yet wonderful variations! It’s a lot like life, even.
Ending on a high note, Tom Carpenter concludes — somewhat thoughtfully — thus: “This synth is a journey of discovery. You’ll take the occasional wrong turn, but you’ll also make many exhilarating turns, and each destination will be nirvana-like. Life is all about the journey. So experience and play.” 

Impulse Command is now available for purchase — priced at an RRP of £849.00 GBP (ex. VAT)/1,179.00 EUR (inc. tax)/ $1,199.00 USD (inc. tax) — through Analogue Solutions’ growing global network of authorised dealers (http://www.analoguesolutions.com/dealers/) or order online directly from Analogue Solutions via the dedicated Impulse Command webpage (http://www.analoguesolutions.com/impulse-command), which also includes more in-depth information.

Watch Analogue Solutions’ introductory Impulse Command video here:https://youtu.be/3vW6NXIwOy0 

Doepfer goes Full Poly

Doepfer dives deeper into industry-standard Eurorack small-format modular system with quirky quintet of polyphonic modules


GRAEFELFING, GERMANY: 
having made musical waves during a show-stopping showcase of prototypes closer to home at SUPERBOOTH18 in Berlin, Germany, esteemed electronic musical device designer Doepfer is proud to globally announce availability of its A-111-4 Quad VCOA-105-4 Quad Poly SSI VCFA-132-8 Octal Poly VCAA-141-4 Quad Poly VCADSR, and A-190-5 Polyphonic USB/Midi to CV/Gate Interface — a quirky quintet of polyphonic modules that sees the trailblazing company diving deeper into the now-industry-standard Eurorack small-format modular system standard that it initiated and popularised with its ever-expanding A-100 ANALOG MODULAR SYSTEM — as of March 1…
Who better to throw light on the thinking behind this quirky quintet than company CEO Dieter Doepfer himself. “Modular synthesizers are almost exclusively monophonic structures since true polyphonic patches require a lot of modules — at least four VCOs, four VCFs, four VCAs, and eight ADSRs for a ‘classic’ four-voice patch,” he begins. “But even then it’s difficult to control filter resonance or modulation depth of all the filters, for example, or the attack and decay time of all the envelope generators simultaneously. So now it’s possible to integrate these functions into the modular synth world with our polyphonic modules, though the idea is not just to recreate a standard polyphonic synth within the modular system but rather realise new polyphonic structures that go far beyond a standard polyphonic synth and also far beyond the typical monophonic structures of a modular system since they still offer access to all parameters via CV or gate.”
Getting going, then,

the A-111-4 Quad VCO module features four precision CEM3340-based — triangle core — VCOs (Voltage Controlled Oscillators), each with its own separate internal +/- power supply (to ensure stability and prevent unwanted VCO synchronisation). Each VCO has the same individual controls, and inputs/outputs, as follows: 1V/Octave CV In (Control Voltage input); +1 / 0 / -1 Octave switch; Tune control, with ~ 2 semitones / ~ 1 octave / ~ 4 octaves range selectable via internal jumpers; Mod. (modulation) CV In (Control Voltage input); Modulation Destination — upper position equals exponential frequency modulation (XM) and lower position equals linear frequency modulation (LMor pulse-width modulation of the rectangle waveform (PM), selectable via internal jumper; frequency modulation (FM) or pulse- width modulation (PWM) of the rectangle waveform; Mod. Level (modulation intensity); triangle waveform output; sawtooth waveform output; rectangle waveform output — about 50% without external pulse-width modulation; SYC (sync) input — (CEM3340-type) hard or soft sync selectable via internal jumper; and minimum 10 octaves range (with appropriate external control voltage). Continuing further down its familiar (silver-grey) front panel, a Master section for all four VCOs includes the following controls and inputs/outputs: 1V/Octave CV In (Control Voltage input); +1 / 0 / -1 Octave switch; Tune control, with ~ 2 semitones / ~ 1 octave / ~ 4 octaves range selectable via internal jumpers; exponential frequency modulation (XMCV In (Control Voltage input); triangle waveform sum output; sawtooth waveform sum output; and rectangle waveform sum output. Typical applications include: fat-sounding monophonic VCO with the ability to adjust any intervals; paraphonic patches — when working in combination with the A-190-5 Polyphonic USB/Midi to CV/Gate Interface and all four VCOs being processed by one VCF/VCA section; fully polyphonic patches — when working in combination with the A-190-5 Polyphonic USB/Midi to CV/Gate Interface and four complete VCF/VCA sections; complex VCO patches with up to four VCOs by means of the — exponential and linear — frequency modulation features and sync functions.


Following in (traditional subtractive synthesis) sequence, the A-105-4 Quad Poly SSI VCF module is Doepfer’s first polyphonic filter, featuring four identical 24dB lowpass (SSM2044-type) filters. The module itself includes the following controls and inputs/outputs: (frequency); FM (frequency modulation) intensity; (resonance); audio input (level); CVF (control voltage frequency) attenuator; CVFM (control voltage frequency modulation) attenuator; CVQ (control voltage resonance) attenuator; CVL (control voltage level) attenuator; CVF (control voltage frequency) socket; CVFM (control voltage frequency modulation) socket; CVQ (control voltage resonance) socket; CVL (control voltage level) socket; FM (frequency modulation) – sockets; audio In (input) – sockets; and audio Out (output) – sockets, so each filter features a separate FM input as well as an audio input and output. The FM input is typically connected to the output of the associated envelope generator, such as Doepfer’s A-141-4 Quad Poly VCADSR, while the envelope amount for all four filters is controlled by the FM knob and the CVFM input by four built-in VCAs, which are also controlled by the FM control and CVFM input to also allow voltage control of the envelope amounts. Additionally, it is also possible to apply frequency modulation to all four filters — for example, using an LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator) patched into the CVF socket and using the associated (CVF) attenuator. The range of the audio input level (L) control also allows clipping/ distortion with typical A-100 ANALOG MODULAR SYSTEM audio levels — from, for example, the A-141-4 Quad Poly VCADSR module — at the filter inputs. This parameter is also voltage controllable, as is the resonance (Q). Applications include polyphonic patches requiring four VCFs with the same parameters.


Perfectly named, the A-132-8 Octal Poly VCA module is an octal VCA (Voltage Controlled Amplifier), primarily primed for polyphonic applications. As such, it includes four pairs of VCAs — each pair including two daisy-chained VCAs, with one VCA having a linear control scale and the other a linear or exponential control scale, selectable via internal jumpers. Two VCAs are provided for each voice since one VCA is usually required for the loudness envelope and another for velocity (or other functions like individual voltage-controlled loudness of each voice, amplitude modulation, and so on). All VCAs are DC coupled and can be used in specialised applications and also for processing control voltages. The module features two Default Gain controls — GL and GX — that enable opening of the first four VCAs (L) and/or second four VCAs (X), with GL and GX generating two internal (0 – +10V) control voltages which are connected to the switching contacts of the 1L – 4L sockets (controlling GL) and 1X – 4X sockets (controlling GX). If no patch cable is inserted into the socket in question then the internal default (GL or GX) control voltage is used to control the corresponding VCA. This is necessary when the VCA in question is not in use — when no external control voltage is available, for instance, otherwise the VCA would close and there would be no output signal even if the other VCA in the chain is open. On the other hand, as soon as a patch cable is inserted into one of the CV Inputs then the corresponding internal default control voltage — CL or CX knob — is no longer used to control the VCA in question; rather an external control voltage patched to the CV Inputs now controls the level of the VCA in question. The GL and GX controls are also useful for testing polyphonic patches — tuning VCOs, for example.
Again, as implied by name,

the A-141-4 Quad Poly VCADSR module is a quad voltage-controlled envelope generator — again, primarily primed for polyphonic applications. As such, it features four ADSR-type voltage-controlled envelope generators with exponential curve shapes (charge/discharge curves of a capacitor). Common manual controls and CVACVDCVS, and CVR inputs with corresponding polarizers are available for the attack (A), decay (D), sustain (S), and release (R) parameters. All four envelope generators have a gate input (G1 – G4), a control LED, and an envelope output (Out1 – Out4). Applications include polyphonic patches, such as four envelope generators with the same envelope parameters to control four VCFs, VCAs, or other modules.
Last, but by no means least, by providing four voices with a 1V/octave-standard CV Note (pitch control voltage) to control VCOs and a Gate output (to control envelope generators), alongside two additional (CV2 and CV3) control voltages, the appropriately-named 

A-190-5 Polyphonic USB/Midi to CV/Gate Interface module does what it says on the tin. Those two additional control voltage outputs can be controlled by MIDI velocity, volume, modulation, pitch bend, aftertouch, or freely-assignable MIDI controllers. Multiple — four-voice monophonic (to control four monophonic voices by four successive MIDI channels); four-voice polyphonic (to control four monophonic voices by one MIDI channel) with several (rotating/non-rotating) sub-modes; two-voice polyphonic (to control two monophonic voices by one MIDI channel); and unison — modes are selected by switches with the result shown in the LCD. In play mode, for example, the LEDs of the first four switches display the gate states, while certain parameters of each mode can be edited.
Ending on a high note, Dieter Doepfer deduces, “Modular synthesizers will still be predominantly used for monophonic sounds, as I’m well aware, but at least one polyphonic sound appears in many pieces of music and now it’s possible to integrate this into the modular synth world with our polyphonic modules.” 

Within Germany, the A-111-4 Quad VCO, A-105-4 Quad Poly SSI VCF, A-132-8 Octal Poly VCA, A-141-4 Quad Poly VCADSR, and A-190-5 Polyphonic USB/Midi to CV/Gate Interface modules can be ordered online from Doepfer directly (http://www.doepfer.de/form_e.htm) or via one of its German dealers (https://docs.doepfer.eu/en/dealer-germany/) for €400.00 EUR, €200.00 EUR, €160.00 EUR, €160.00 EUR, and €300.00 EUR, respectively.


Outside of Germany, the A-111-4 Quad VCO, A-105-4 Quad Poly SSI VCF, A-132-8 Octal Poly VCA, A-141-4 Quad Poly VCADSR, and A-190-5 Polyphonic USB/Midi to CV/Gate Interface modules can only be ordered from Doepfer dealers in the territories listed here: https://docs.doepfer.eu/en/ (Note that residents in countries without representation can, however, order from Doepfer directly.)
For more in-depth information, please visit the dedicated A-111-4 Quad VCO webpage here: http://www.doepfer.de/A1114.htm

For more in-depth information, please visit the dedicated A-105-4 Quad Poly SSI VCF webpage here: http://www.doepfer.de/a1054.htm
For more in-depth information, please visit the dedicated A-132-8 Octal Poly VCA webpage here: http://www.doepfer.de/a1328.htm
For more in-depth information, please visit the dedicated A-141-4 Quad Poly VCADSR webpage here: http://www.doepfer.de/a1414.htm
For more in-depth info, please visit the dedicated A-190-5 Polyphonic USB/Midi to CV/Gate Interface webpage here: http://www.doepfer.de/a1905.htm 

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Who is making the SP-2400 and is it real? It’s not who you thought exclusive pictures!

What if I told you the SP 2400 is real… its not Behringer and Its NOT E-MU/Rossum. It is going to be built as a proper spiritual successor to the classic sampler many of us have grown to love so dearly. This is no clone, this is something more…

Obviously it’s a render, but it’s coming

Recently I came across a post showing what appears to be a circuit board for a “sp-2400” this name has long been tossed about in forums and back Alley dives as to what the successor to the famed sp-1200 could be. Over the years there have been many rumors, requests and out right denials from those involved in the classic sampler.

Oh hello , nice to meet you SP 2400

So what is speculation and what is fact?

FACTS…..24bit AND 12 bit, Aluminum construction, Classic sound with the Classic workflow. Filters per output, ability to sample with filter input or direct to dac. Features both usb host and client, Each pad will play cowbells (if you sample a cowbell to it) its not behringer… it is real, and it IS COMING SOON

How do I know all of this? well I was given the info directly from the manufacturer. I have basically been given a slow stream of info… I myself still do not know the release date, the price point, what info is on the screen and how the screen functions… I will give info as I can.

I can tell you… I have heard it (audio comparisons sent to me of an early build)… it sounds fantastic. It is going to make many of us very happy… and the corksniffers… so mad. I will be dropping random tid bits about this as they fall out the back of the secret laboratory this is being built in.

Mode Machines new Seq12 analog and midi sequencer released

MODE MACHINES make matrix-style sequencing truly tactile with SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER
 innovative electronic musical devices brand MODE MACHINES is proud to announce availability of its SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER — a multi-channel MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) step sequencer in a truly tactile, tabletop (rack-mountable) console-type housing that lends itself to creating and arranging pattern-based music as a live performance-capable standalone sequencing tool or working alongside a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) to enhance production possibilities — as of July 16…
As implied by the 12 TRACK MATRIX SEQUENCER ‘subtitle’ boldly blazoned across its expansive top panel — pressed into play by the 12-line (and 16- column) arrangement of (red) backlit LED (Light Emitting Diode) buttons that musically mark out the namesake matrix laying claim to the majority of that top panel, the SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER is a 12-track affair, with each track arranged numerically below the next in the matrix. More meaningfully, each track can freely address one of three MIDI outputs (OUT 1, OUT 2, and OUT 3) to ensure optimal timing (by avoiding serial chaining of connected MIDI devices) and additionally be assigned to one of three track types: MONO (monophonic) — plays only one note per step (sending note, velocity, and note length) and offers three controller tracks (C1, C2, C3); POLY (Polyphonic) — plays back multiple notes per step (sending note, velocity, note length, and chord) and offers two controller tracks (C1, C2); and DRUM — optimised to address drum machines (or similar) with the matrix forming a pattern where each line can be set to transmit a definable note to 12 so-called subtracks (with adjustable velocity and accented notes) from within a single track with two controller tracks (C1, C2)… 12 different drum sounds can be arranged from a single track, in other words.
While the term step sequencing can conjure up mesmerising musical images of repetitive note patterns pioneered and popularised by the likes of Germany’s homegrown Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream in their heyday — the likes of which the SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER of course can capably emulate, even down to the latter’s ‘trademark’ ratchet effect (of outputting multiple triggers per step) but bettered by enabling easy creation of rolls, flams, and comparable complex rhythmical functions courtesy of six selectable trigger patterns and a note value to adjust the length of the trigger pattern, there is so much more to this truly tactile step sequencer than might meet the (untrained) eye… eye-catching as all of those 192 flashy (red) backlit LED buttons already are!
Although the SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER is at heart a pattern-based step sequencer that generates MIDI data, multiple modes make it stand out from the sound of the (step sequencing) crowd — to partially paraphrase the early-Eighties British breakthrough hit from synth-pop pioneers The Human League, no strangers to the lure of spellbinding step sequencing themselves.
The self-explanatory SEQ mode is used to program a sequence — the smallest ‘unit’ within the SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER (containing up to 16 steps) — using the matrix or an external MIDI input device, such as a master keyboard controller connected via the single MIDI IN (input). 16 sequences per track can be stored with parameter values such as velocity, controllers, or step length displayed as backlit LED (button) bars in the matrix.
Meanwhile, JAM mode makes live performance pleasurable and also inspirational with the SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER. This time the matrix displays 12 tracks with 16 sequences each, all of which are freely switchable on the fly for immediate playback while the function buttons to the left of the matrix mute and activate the corresponding 12 tracks. And assuming that the tracks are tasked with handling different musical parts — playing a melody with track 1, a bass line with track 2, chords with track 3, and drums with track 4, for example — then it is perfectly possible to create a song on the fly. Flexibility further abounds since switching from JAM mode to SEQ mode only involves a couple of (almost instant) clicks; once there, users can, likewise, edit the selected sequences on the fly.
Finally, SONG mode is where the SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER sings for its supper, so-to-speak, allowing for the creation and playback of longer and more complex arrangements or even full songs. Each track is allocated an individual series of up to 64 sequences (or sequence chains in ‘SEQ12- speak’). Still better, there are 12 sequence chains — one for each track; these combine to create a part, with the SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER storing up to eight parts. Parts can also be changed on the fly while the sequencer is running, so, given that those parts could effectively equal song parts, users could choose from, say, an intro, verse, bridge, chorus, or outro, each of which could be called up to be played anytime.
All data that can be changed by the user — namely, sequences, parts, and sequence chains, as well as global settings (with further visual guidance coming courtesy of an informative backlit LCD working in conjunction with various clearly labelled control functions) — is stored as a setup. The SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER stores up to 32 setups. So it is ready and willing to be put through its interactive musical paces onstage or in the studio, thanks to its robust rack-mountable (19-inch/6 HE) design that also includes rubber feet for non-slip tabletop usage.
Ultimately, then, the truly tactile SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER surely ranks as an ultimate pattern-based step sequencer, limited only by its user’s imagination rather than ‘traditional’ step sequencing’s limited note pattern repetition. Reach out and touch… as Depeche Mode sang on their way to sequencer-driven superstardom!
The SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER is available to purchase directly from MODE MACHINES’ online SHOP (https://www.modemachines.com/shop) at an introductory promo price of €999.00 EUR (inc. VAT) or through MODE MACHINES’ growing global network of authorised dealers (https://www.modemachines.com/where-to-buy).
For more in-depth information, please visit the dedicated SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER webpage here: https://www.modemachines.com/seq12
Watch MODE MACHINE’s SEQ12 ANALOG AND MIDI SEQUENCER intro video here: https://youtu.be/lKxNBnHhOkI

Dark Energy III from Doepfer announced

Doepfer harnesses dark energy for third time with effectively enhanced monophonic analogue standalone synth namesake
GRAEFELFING, GERMANY: having wowed North American audiences with a preproduction prototype at The 2018 NAMM Show in Anaheim, CA, then turned heads and opened European ears with a must-see showstopper closer to home at SUPERBOOTH18 in Berlin, Germany, esteemed electronic musical device designers Doepfer Musikelektronik is proud to announce availability of the Dark Energy III Analog Synthesizer — a worthy successor to its critically-acclaimed desktop Dark Energy II monophonic analogue standalone synthesizer with wide- reaching CV (Control Voltage)/Gate, MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface), and USB (Universal Serial Bus) connectivity that it effectively enhances — as of July 4…
Like its Dark Energy II predecessor, released to widespread critical acclaim back in 2012, Dark Energy III is a desktop monophonic analogue standalone synthesizer with wide-reaching CV/Gate, MIDI, and USB connectivity. Continuing that intriguingly-named lineage, likewise, Dark Energy III’s sound generation and all modulation sources are 100% analogue, with only its inbuilt MIDI/USB components entering the digital arena (as is obviously necessary, naturally). Needless to say, everything is built into a rugged black metal case with wooden side plates, while high-quality potentiometers with metal shafts are used; ultimately, each potentiometer is mounted firmly to the chassis, so no wobbly shafts and knobs — unlike some cheaply-constructed competing (non-Doepfer) designs. Dark Energy III is, indeed, essentially an enhanced version of Doepfer’s desktop standalone synthesizer so central to the company’s product line for so long, but boasts several notable differences.
Notably — not least audibly, although also apparent from the front panel’s waveform Shape switch labelling, a triangle Shape waveform is now central to the VCO (Voltage-Controlled Oscillator) core, which now no longer requires a warmup period for optimal operation over a 10-octave frequency range (with 1V/Oct tracking over at least eight octaves).
On top of that, there are now separate Reset LFO1 and Reset LFO 2 Inputs for the two resettable LFOs (Low Frequency Oscillators). These sockets synchronise both LFOs to external gate signals, so when a gate signal of +5V (or higher) is applied at a socket then its positive ramp sets the corresponding LFO wave shape to zero and the LFO restarts with a rising ramp.
All analogue synthesizers use a VCA (Voltage-Controlled Amplifier) to dynamically control loudness (or volume); Doepfer’s Dark Energy III design differs from its predecessor — and also many other analogue synthesizers — by virtue of its VCA having a linear control scale, so lends itself to scaling control voltages.
Several signal routings and functions are additionally available to any adventurous ‘Doepfer DIY’er’ willing and able to modify Dark Energy III’s front panel sockets by removing jumpers and rewiring the pin-headers for the VCO PW, Reset LFO1, Reset LFO2, and VCA Inputs. For example, the VCO PW input can be converted into a linear FM input, or LFO/ADSR signals can be used as outputs instead of one of the resettable LFO inputs. Indeed, (almost) anything is possible, including various VCO outputs (triangle, sawtooth, rectangle); VCO hard sync input; VCO soft sync input; various VCF outputs (lowpass, highpass, bandpass); various LFO outputs (triangle, rectangle); ADSR output; and two inverters with input/output (to invert any signal, such as ADSR or LFO).
Effective enhancements notwithstanding, the favoured filter found in Dark Energy II remains unchanged in Dark Energy III. Indeed, its sound- defining VCF (Voltage-Controlled Filter) is centred around a 12dB multimode filter with lowpass, notch, highpass, and bandpass settings, together with a filter Mode control for continuous transition from lowpass via notch and highpass around to bandpass; its XFM (Exponential Frequency Modulation) control also has a polarization function, whereby the modulation source (LFO2 or ADSR) selected by the Source switch can affect the filter frequency with a positive or negative behaviour (by rotating rightwards or leftwards, respectively).
Meanwhile, mounting of two or more Dark Energy — original, II, and III — units is possible, with or without wooden side plates between them. Though there is still not sufficient space to accommodate a dedicated MIDI output socket on the Dark Energy III rear panel, it is still possible for those adventurous ‘Doepfer DIY’ers’ to link two or more Dark Energy — original, II, and III — units via MIDI out/MIDI in using the two pin-headers available at the supply/interface board mounted at the rear panel. (Fortunately for them, Doepfer has helpfully posted a downloadable document with additional technical information here: http://www.doepfer.de/pdf/Dark_Energy_III_technical_information.pdf.)
Put it this way: with Dark Energy III, Doepfer delivers another effective enhancement of a highly-capable monophonic analogue standalone synthesizer, continuing to make its musical mark with a compact desktop design dating back to 2010 (when wowing audiences around the world with its original Dark Energy entry).
Ending on a high note, who better to tender tasty food for thought, then, than Doepfer Musikelektronik CEO Dieter Doepfer, the esteemed electronic musical devices designer who lends his notable name to the renowned company and has been known to look beyond our world for inspiration: “Dark Energy III is not a tool for space research, neither is it suitable for studies in astrophysics. Yet, we find these topics as fascinating as music technology — reason enough to celebrate ‘Hubble & Co.’s amazing discoveries a bit and call our brand-new synthesizer Dark Energy III.”
In Germany, Dark Energy III can be ordered online from Doepfer Musikelektronic GmbH (http://www.doepfer.de/form_e.htm) or via one of its German dealers (https://docs.doepfer.eu/en/dealer-germany/) for €479.00 EUR. (An optional user-installable Glide control kit — containing a prewired potentiometer with two nuts and a Dark Energy-style rotary knob — is available for €10.00 EUR.)
Outside Germany, Dark Energy III can only be ordered from Doepfer dealers in territories listed here: https://docs.doepfer.eu/en/ (That said, residents in countries without representation can order directly from Doepfer Musikelektronic GmbH.)
For more in-depth info, please visit the dedicated Dark Energy III webpage here: http://www.doepfer.de/Dark_Energy_III_e.htm