Audio Damage freshens its line up with new plugins!

Audio Damage is Has released 3 new plug in VSTs available directly from their site. New versions of the Delay Plug in “Dubstation 2″, Reverb Plug in ” EOS 2 ” and the all new waveshaping distortion “Grind” are now available. 

EOS 2 consists of four high-quality custom-designed reverb algorithms, made with the modern production environment in mind. Three different plate simulators and Audio Damage’s own Superhall algorithm give you a broad palette of reverb, and the easy-to-understand interface makes adjusting the algorithms to suit your track incredibly simple.

Dubstation 2

From the Audio damage site:

The original dub delay plugin and still the best! Dubstation 2 takes our most popular product and adds a whole raft of new features, including a dual mode for separate control over the left and right delay times, ping-pong, a new feedback saturation algorithm, and an LFO. Along with an all-new procedural and Retina-friendly user interface and (FINALLY!) ProTools compatibility, this represents a major leap forward for one of our signature products.

All those bells and whistles aside, the heart of Dubstation is our painstaking bucket-brigade delay model. Often imitated, but never duplicated, Dubstation has been the go-to plugin for that sound for over a decade, used in thousands of commercial productions, and with good reason. With the addition of the LFO and saturation controls, Dubstation has moved in to the realm of tape delay emulation as well, and is a sonic Swiss Army knife for delay. 

Grind waveshape distortion

from the AD site:

A true powerhouse of audio warfare, Grind puts the “damage” in Audio Damage. From subtle tube-style saturation to full-on mangled wavetable distortion, Grind is a Swiss Army Knife of sound design.

Grind consists of three main blocks: wavetable lookup, in to algorithmic saturation/distortion/, and finally to a multi-mode filter. The wavetable module uses the amplitude of the incoming signal to replace the sample with one from 15 different linearly-interpolated wavetables, chosen for their mangling potential. Window size and phase controls provide further tone-shaping possibilities.

The next stop is the algorithm module, with eleven different distortion and saturation algorithms, from simple soft-knee saturation on up to full on sine warping.

After this, the signal passes through a multi-mode filter stage, with eleven different filter models to choose from, including “vintage digital” versions from the early days of plugin development, on up to our modern analog-modeled MS20-style lowpass and highpass synth filters. A tempo-synced LFO provides motion for the filter frequency, and a final stage of soft clipping and DC filtering tames the output.

Make no mistake: this is not a subtle, polite tool. With careful tuning of the provided presets, it can be tamed to normal filtering and saturation duties, but on the whole, it is a noisy, snorting beast of a plug-in, and is happiest with Full Metal audio destruction. 

OK enough with the AD copy. I have had some time with all three of these (I even created a group of presets for Dubstation 2). I can say these are a really nice step forward in the Audio Damage line up. The UI is really impoved on these (Grind and EOS2 have some killer front end graphics to help understand whats going on).

Grind really impressed me in its filter types as well as how the distortions can take a plain sound and add a ton of movement and character.  Similar to the Eurorack module Shapes also from Audio Damage, Grind lets you sequence lookup tables and waveshaping wavetables… very freaking cool.

tempo syncing the waveshaping and filter frequency changes is a joy.

Dubstation 2 is a very straight foward BBD sounding delay that will let you just easily get that dub delay you are after without a cluttered interface.

EOS 2 is just a joy to look at and hear. I’ve been using this to create gorgeous synth pads and basically create environments for my instruments to breathe in.

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Waldorf Slickly Announces New iOS Drum Synth App!

Screen Shot 2015-04-14 at 9.10.35 AMWaldorf CEO

Stefan Stenzel has recently uploaded a track on Soundcloud titled “All I am is Digital” 

The Track appears to be the first sonic demo of the NEW Waldorf iOS drum synth app “ATTACK Drums” from the tunes it looks to be very promising. there is also a screenshot of the start up screen similar to NAVE’s start up screen. Here is the description on sound cloud

“Song made entirely in a preliminary version of Waldorf Attack Drums App for iOS. In case you hear vocals, these are synthesised using the built-in Phrase Vocoder – a novel Vocoder that uses written text instead of spoken words as modulator.” … check it out here. http://www.waldorf-music.info/attack-drums-overview

Specifications

  • ios attack padspage24 different sounds
  • 4 independent insert effects with
  • Delay
  • EQ
  • Drive
  • Phaser
  • Flanger
  • Chorus
  • Phrase Vocoder – a novel vocoder controlled by written text
  • Algorithmic reverb as send from every single effect channel or directly from sound
  • Compressor for the output sum
  • 16-step pattern sequencer
  • Fractional track/step timing
  • Polyphonic steps
  • Audiobus support
  • Inter App Audio support
  • Core MIDI support
  • Export song to audio file
  • Dynamic voice allocation
  • compatible with iPad 3 (Retina), iPad mini (1,2,3), iPad Air (1,2)
  • Minimum iOS 7.0 required
  • Content control via iTunes
  • Trigger pads
  • Mixer
  • Recording
  • Shipping 2 quarter of 2015

Creating your own sounds Pt. 7 ( Simply Green)

Simply Green
The art of
Reusing sound

Once you have a collection of sounds you may want to reuse them without them sounding the same.
There are many techniques that don’t require an awful lot of work to sculpt a drum to an individual track. One of the easiest improvements to a sound is to Tune your kick drums to your bass line. This can prevent clashing of sound and drastically improve a mix. If you have a long ringing 808 style kick you can toss a tuner such as guitar rig over the sound and watch what key the drum is tuned to. By simply pitching up or down you can tune it to the key of your bass line. simply throw a tuner (guitar rig for example) onto your kick track is a dirty fast way to get an idea of your kick or you can use a spectrum analyzer and look at where the harmonic frequencies are prominent. though I tend to just use my ears for this process.
Another great way to sculpt a pre made drum is by using bit crushing or distortion. Adding subtle to drastic hints of lo-fi to a pristine sample can really change the overall sound of a kit and create a drum sound totally new.
Don’t forget filtering and layering of premade sounds as well. And always keep an eye on your levels. When stacking premade drums it’s very easy to start clipping so turn it down a bit and you shall be fine. Adding harmonics to a sound can be a great way to alter a drum or instrument as well. adding Ring modulators and tuning the ring mod then resampling is a great way to enhance a sound. There are pleny of options and ways to do this. Everything from guitar plug ins and actual hardware fx pedals to Reaktor ensembles to simply getting creative with the EQ.
Also a spectrum analyzer can help you see trouble frequencies you might not be hearing such as increased bass tones below 40hz that are causing mixes to peak even though they sound quiet. Simply filter them out or use a sculpting EQ.
Sometimes simply routing sounds out of your computer and through something simple like a korg monotron or a aha pedal can change the sound just enough to make it feel new and fresh to you. Experiment and have fun with it.