4ms Dual looping delay eurorack modular delay Namm 2016

The Dual Looping Delay (DLD) is an advanced audio processor for creative synthesis. Not a tape or analog emulation but a modern crystal-clear digital delay, the DLD combines features of delay, looping, and sample-tight synchronization for powerful and dynamic sound capture and modification. The DLD is designed to integrate seamlessly with modular timebase and sequencing devices such as the 4ms Quad Clock Distributor (QCD), etc.




Key Features:

  • Two independent delay/loop channels, synchronized to a common time base
  • Maximum 88 seconds per channel (almost 3 minutes total recording time)
  • 48kHz/16-bit sampling rate
  • Normaled connections of input and output for flexible use in mono, stereo, or dual mode
  • Tap tempo button and clock Ping input
  • Delay/loop time set as a number of musical beats (or fractions of beats) using the Time knob, switch, and CV jack
  • Sample-accurate clock output for perfect synchronization
  • Loop clock outputs for each channel
  • Time switches change range of Time knob from 1/8th notes up to 32 bars
  • Digital feedback, up to 110%
  • Delay Level control, independent of dry/wet signal mix
  • Infinite Hold mode disables recording input and fixes regeneration at exactly 100%
  • Reverse mode plays memory contents backwards
  • With an infinite loop locked, Time knob allows for “windowing” around memory
  • Triggered toggle inputs for Infinite Hold and Reverse
  • Send and Return on each channel for feedback with external modules
  • CV jacks to control Time, Level, and Feedback
  • As new features are developed, firmware can be updated by playing an audio file into the DLD
  • 20HP Eurorack module

Hexinverter.net Mutant hot Glue DIY on DRUMS!



In this video I showcase the Hexinverter.net Mutant Hot Glue on the Dave Smith Instruments Tempest drum machine. I show the different flavors of distortion and compression.  More to come so stay tuned!



4 Channel Mixer with Effects Send

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Pittsburgh Modular makes modular effects pedals possible!

Pittsburgh Modular makes modular effects pedals dream come true at Musikmesse 2015
PITTSBURGH, PA, USA: modern, fully-patchable, modular synthesizers and accessories manufacturer Pittsburgh Modular is proud to launch its Patch Box line of modular effects pedals — redefining both modular synthesis and the venerable stomp box by creating unique patchable effects units for guitarists and keyboardists — at Musikmesse 2015, January 15-18 in Frankfurt, Germany…

In a seismic shift in the definition of what a modular synthesizer can be, Pittsburgh Modular’s Patch Box redefines modular synthesis around the venerable stomp box by creating a monster performance device for guitarists and keyboardists alike — a patchable, modular system designed to handle anything. As a playground for unrestricted creativity, the Patch Box is a fully-patchable, customisable performance pedal enclosure. Its open architecture allows users to create unique effects unattainable with standard, fixed-signal path guitar effects. The Patch Box is not just another empty Eurorack case, however. Rather it can be packed to the gills with the functionality of (up to) five highly-tuned modules integrated into a heavy-duty steel enclosure that’s as road-ready as it is ready to use.
To protect the tone of user instruments, thoughtfully the Patch Box features a true BYPASS and a unique preamp with extremely high headroom in addition to a pair of fully-buffered outputs. Custom-engineered soft-limiting circuitry built into the preamp adds character without unwanted noise at higher gain settings. Said preamp has dual, buffered outputs to allow for complex signal routing, but for patching a single modulation or audio source into two destinations, the patchable signal splitter is a perfect solution. Also known as a MULTIPLE, the signal splitter has one input and two outputs, allowing any signal to be routed to two destinations.
Dual, assignable expression pedal INPUTS allow the Patch Box to easily integrate third-party expression pedals anywhere into the signal path to allow for realtime foot control of any voltage-controllable parameter or split the signal from the foot controller to control two parameters at once. Dual, assignable A/B foot switches — SWITCH 1 and SWITCH 2 — expand signal routing options. Perfect for use as on/off switches or to flip between two signals, the foot switches can be patched up to enable/disable individual modules or route audio and control voltages. Try patching a modulation source, such as an LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator) or external expression pedal, through the foot switch to enable or disable the modulation while playing. Patch the outputs of two effects into one of the foot switches to bounce between effects. With two independent, patchable foot switches to play with, there are countless options for realtime signal routing. The last stage of the Patch Box signal path is a master OUTPUT level control. Adjust the output signal level to connect with a wide range of devices.

How to Synth DIY part 5 PT2399 Delay Dev board!

Part 5 The PT2399 DEV DELAY KIT


This circuit is actually very very simple to assemble and shouldn’t really take you more than a half hour tops to build.

It comprises of a board with pads for a few knobs and jacks, as well as a few extra parts so that you can play around and add modifications to the circuit. The PT2399 is a chip that is found in MANY guitar delay pedals. It is a digital chip that emulates the analog bucket brigade. As delay times get longer, the audio degrades. This can be used to great effect when you start to play with long delay times and feedback.

In this video I build the PT2399 Dev board, I do not show me building in any mods. The reason for this is I want you to feel free to experiment with the board. you won’t harm the chip its quite robust and is great fun to play with “circuit bending” it. just basically wire up a momentary switch (included with the kit) and touch the leads to any two points you find interested (by poking a piece of wire around you may find the chip behavior act interesting). For the final circuit I went with the suggested Feedblast the warp and the feedback as pictured below.



instructions for these mods can be found HERE http://www.synthrotek.com/kit-assembly-instructions/other/pt2399-dev-delay-assembly-instructions/

The kit only costs : $30 so… hard to beat for a funky ass delay right?

Check the video and have fun!


HOW to Synth DIY Series Part 2 (Kit list and soldering info)

How to synth DIY part 2

Synthrotek logo

Now that we have established some basics it is time to take a look at what we are actually going to be doing in this series. I want to start off by giving a list of the Synthrotek Kits we will need in order to complete this series. You can purchase these kits as we go along or all of them upfront (getting them upfront is not a bad idea as we will likely have some live Q&A sessions and it will be nice for you to have the kits ready).

Here are the planned kits that will be involved.

1) Passive Ring Mod Kit (think Dalek voice)

2) 4093 Chaoss Nand kit (drone oscillator)

3) 555 Timer kit (this will be used as an LFO to control delay etc)

4) Dirt Filter 9v kit (distortion and filtering)

5) PT2399 Dev Board kit  (this is a digital delay that emulates analog delay chips)

6 Vac Pack (adds CV control to any variable resistance controlled circuit)

7) Plastic Enclosure  (this will be what we place all our items into) you are not limited to use just this case, feel free to use more than one case or a larger case if you like.

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Korg Kp2 Kaoss pad Pad motion Toggle Mod

Korg Kaoss Pad 2 always lacked one thing


I love the Kaoss pad kp2 but it always lacked a very simple feature. The ability to play your XY modulations without having to touch the unit.  Well today I finally got sick of that lack of functionality and decided to do something about it.  By installing a simple single throw single pole toggle switch I am now able to trigger my Pad motion without holding down the spring loaded toggle switch. why korg didn’t simply include a button for this is far beyond me but hey, the mod is quite simple and straight forward.



First I took out my multi meter and checked the pins to find where continuity would be breaking and making.

20140421_121817 once you have located the placement of the switch wires to make a path for the switch. remove the microphone input board gently.KP2mod1edit20140421_124134Usiing a Dremel tool make a whole where you want the switch keeping in mind that you need to keep the switch close to the main board so that you don’t hit the capacitors when you reinstall the microphone board.20140421_124607Solder the wiring one leg to each side of the switch. be careful not to over heat the board. If possible bend away any tabs that might come in contact with the microphone board to prevent shorts

20140421_124554Reinstall the microphone board and put all the screws back in place. you are now ready to have fun !

Synthrotek EKO building and Demo video

I love doing Eurorack kits. They are more affordable than assembled versions. They give you the satisfaction of actually having a hand in the quality of your module. It is simply a load of fun to know that you helped create this new sound source in your set up.

That being said, I have yet to do a video showing how I build the kits and get them up and running so here is  a short video showing the latest addition to my Eurorack Modular synth. the Synthrotek EKO

available here

Assembled version here–> http://store.synthrotek.com/EKO_Voltage_Controlled_Echo

Kit version here —> http://store.synthrotek.com/EKO_Voltage_Controlled_Echo_Kit

Product info:
– Rate range: 30-190mS
– 4HP
– Voltage-controlled rate
– Self-oscillating feedback
– Mix control
– Hand-assembled in Portland, Oregon